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Waves

Stormy waves in the open ocean As wind moves across the surface of the ocean, the water turns over and over in circles, forming waves. The stronger the wind and the wider the expanse of ocean it has blown across, the greater the waves. The wave itself moves along, but the water in a wave does not. It spins around in the same place and makes the water below turn, too.  In mid-ocean, large waves, called swell, can develop. 


Breakers

As wind moves across the surface of the ocean, the water turns over and over in circles, forming waves. As the waves approach a...Read More >>As wind moves across the surface of the ocean, the water turns over and over in circles, forming waves. As the waves approach a shallow shore, they topple over, or "break", on to the shore.As a wave approaches the shallower seashore, the lower part drags on the sea bed, causing the circular spinning motion to become more and more elliptical (oval) in shape. Eventually the upper part of the wave topples over, or breaks, on the shore.

The highest wave height ever measured was 34 m (112 ft).

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