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A journey round the world: Europe

Switzerland’s most famous mountain is the Matterhorn. It soars to a height of 4478 metres (14,692 feet). Its sharp summit has a...Read More >>Switzerland’s most famous mountain is the Matterhorn. It soars to a height of 4478 metres (14,692 feet). Its sharp summit has a steep drop on all sides.Europe and Asia together form one vast landmass, known as Eurasia. Europe lies west of the Ural Mountains, to the north of the Caucasus Mountains and on the western bank of the Bosporus strait. A large part of Russia and a small area of Turkey both fall within Europe. In the far north, Europe borders the Arctic Ocean. The Gulf Stream, a warm ocean current, gives its northwestern coast a mild, wet climate. Central Europe and Russia have hot summers but cold winters. To the south of the Pyrenees and Alps lie the sunny Mediterranean lands, with their hot summers and mild winters.


A map of Europe
Street musicians, Prague, capital of the Czech Republic

People

Europe's population is particularly dense in the lowlands of western Europe. Here cities have grown up close to one another and, in some cases, merged with one another. Waterways and road and rail networks link Europe's major cities. Only a few large areas of uninhabited land remain in the far north, in Scandinavia. Much of Europe's population growth is caused not by births but by immigrants, people who have travelled there from other continents.

There are no mountains in Denmark. The highest point is a hill called Møllehøj, which is just 170 m (561 ft) high.

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