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Squires

A page boy Only the sons of a knight could grow up to be a knight. In order to fulfil their destiny, they had to go through years of training as a squire, to learn the fighting skills and the code of chivalrous behaviour that was expected of a knight. The first step was to become a page. At the age of 7 he was sent to work in the household of another knight or noble lord. A page performed a variety of tasks in his master’s household, including helping his master dress in the mornings and serving food and drinks at mealtimes.



A young squire spends long hours learning swordsmanship, using wooden swords in mock duals with other squires.

Becoming a squire

At the age of 15, the page became a squire, acting as a personal servant to a knight. By this time, he was spending long hours learning swordsmanship, using wooden swords in mock duals with other squires. A squire dedicated his life to learning from his master: how to ride a horse, how to fight with a sword, mace, lance or axe, and how to out-think an opponent in battle.
 
 
 

If a squire could not afford all the expenses of becoming a full knight—maintaining horses, purchasing armour, hiring his own squire etc.—he might remain a knight bachelor, or even not be knighted at all.

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