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Camels

Dromedary Camels are even-toed ungulates—animals with hooves instead of claws. The camel group includes two "true" camels, the dromedary and the Bactrian, and the more distantly related members of the llama family that live in South America. Camels live in deserts or dry scrublands, and have adapted to be able to survive in the harshest of conditions. All dromedaries and most Bactrian camels are domesticated; a few wild Bactrians still roam the Gobi Desert. The feral camels of the Australian deserts are descended from dromedaries that were imported in the 19th century. 


Bactrian camels in the mountains of Jammu and Kashmir, on the border between Indian and Pakistan
Camels' double row of long eyelashes stops sand from blowing into their eyes. Camels also have transparent third eyelids as extra...Read More >>Camels' double row of long eyelashes stops sand from blowing into their eyes. Camels also have transparent third eyelids as extra protective layers.

Desert living

Camels are desert animals. Their flat, wide feet help them to walk over soft sand, and they can even close their nostrils to stop sand blowing in. Using their large, tough lips, camels will eat dry, thorny plant material that other animals would not, and they can go long periods without food or water. 

Camels can go without drinking water for months. When they do drink, they can gulp down over 100 litres (about 400 cupfuls) at a time.

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