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Colugo

Colugo, Southeast Asia, up to 40 cm (16 in) in length Otherwise known as the flying lemur, the colugo glides between the trees of the Southeast Asian rainforest. It has a loose flap of skin that stretches between its neck, fingers, toes and tail. Even the spaces between its fingers and toes are webbed to increase its total surface area. Looking like a kite, it sails through the air for distances of more than 100 metres (over 300 feet) losing very little height. Sometimes a mother carries its young clinging to its belly on the flight.



The colugo clings to a tree trunk.

Climbing

Almost completely helpless on the ground, the colugo will wrap itself in its "cloak", its kite-shaped skin, called a patagium, and haul itself back up to the tops of the trees using its sharp claws. It is a clumsy, but effective, climber. Lacking thumbs for holding branches, it grips on to the bark of trees with its small, sharp claws and pulls itself upwards in slow hops.

Although known as a flying lemur, the colugo is not a lemur and it does not fly.

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