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Diplodocus

Diplodocus roam the Jurassic landscape, along with a Brachiosaurus and a pack of Allosaurus. It is likely that Diplodocus would...Read More >>Diplodocus roam the Jurassic landscape, along with a Brachiosaurus and a pack of Allosaurus. It is likely that Diplodocus would have migrated to new feeding grounds, travelling in herds, once it had consumed all the available food in one area. Diplodocus was an immensely long sauropod that lived in North America during the Jurassic Period. But it was relatively light for its great length, weighing no more than three elephants. It had a large, stocky body with pillar-like legs, the front ones slightly shorter than the back ones. A row of short, pointed spines ran along the ridge of its back. Its long neck ended in a relatively small head. It had an extremely long, whip-like tail.



Diplodocus

Neck

Diplodocus’s neck was 6 metres (20 feet) long. In order to pump blood up to its head, both these dinosaurs would have needed unbelievably large hearts. Scientists have suggested that they may instead have had as many as eight very simple hearts in their chest and neck. Each pumped blood from one heart to the next, like a relay team. Males might have used their long necks to show off to females or intimidate their enemies.
The head and neck of a Diplodocus

Feeding

At 27 m (89 ft) long, Diplodocus is the longest dinosaur known from a complete skeleton.

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