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Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton, aged 47 English scientist Isaac Newton (1642–1727) lived during an exciting period of history, known as the Age of Enlightenment, where many ideas we take for granted today were being put forward for the first time. This explosion of scientific research has been described as the Scientific Revolution. Newton's contribution included greatly furthering our understanding of the laws of motion, how gravity works and the nature of light and colour. Although modern physics explains matter and energy in a very different way, many of Newton’s ideas are still useful today, and have provided the basis for modern science.



Birthplace of Isaac Newton, Woolsthorpe Manor, Lincolnshire, England

Early life

Isaac Newton was born in the village of Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, in 1642. He was educated at local village schools and then at The King’s School in Grantham where he was taught Latin, Greek, Hebrew and mathematics. He lodged with the town’s apothecary (pharmacist), William Clark. Although Newton did not excel at school, his headmaster recognized that Isaac had unusual talents, and persuaded Newton’s mother to allow her son to go to Cambridge University in 1661.

As a boy, Newton spent time making models. They included a windmill, powered by a mouse on a treadmill.

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