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Auguste and Louis Lumière

Auguste and Louis Lumière The brothers Auguste (1862–1954) and Louis (1864–1948) Lumière were the world's first film-makers. In 1895, they gave their first public cinema show in a café in Paris. A succession of short films, none lasting more than 49 seconds, showed scenes of everyday life in the city, such as people leaving their work at a factory, a gardener being sprinkled by his own hose and a train pulling into a station.



Lumière film, Arrival of a Train at a Station{more}

The mechanism for the Cinématographe. This animation shows how the film stock was cranked through the projector using the holes...Read More >>The mechanism for the Cinématographe. This animation shows how the film stock was cranked through the projector using the holes punched in it.

Cinématographe

The Lumière brothers groundbreaking invention, the Cinématographe, could record pictures on to film, and then project them on to a screen for viewing. Their invention made use of perforations, holes punched in the film stock, as a means of advancing the film through the camera and projector. A multi-billion-dollar industry, as well as a dynamic new art form, grew up from their invention.

The world's first-ever movie, screened at the Grand Café in Paris in 1895, shows workers leaving the Lumière factory in Lyon, France. It lasted 46 seconds.

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